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EcoGizmo

EcoGizmo has offered up an online story on the Onplug.Click here to read...

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Throwing the Switch on Phantom Power

The Globe and Mail is reporting on a home owner who is saving $600 per year by cutting phantom power consumption. Seems power bars and OnPlugs are the way to go. Read the article ...

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The OnPlug Power Saver Can Be Bought at

Real Goods

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OnPlug for Dollars

JR Raphael at PC World has done some very cool research on how much money can be saved by getting aggressive on saving vampire power. Looking at some of the numbers in this article one can see that monetary payback on your OnPlug purchase can be quite fast. Of course we know the payback to the environment begins immediately once ...

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Getting Rid of Phantom Power

Phantom power can be referred to as the electrical power consumed by household appliances and gadgets when plugged in a wall outlet and not performing a useful function. Many such devices keep on consuming electricity even if they are turned off. The consumption continues between uses because most of the appliances plugged in the wall outlet are ...

Recent News
Safety Certification
Tuesday, 01 February 2011 14:54

 

The OnPlug Power Saver has passed safety certification and is now a listed product with Intertek under the file number, 4001299.This certification approves use in home across Canada and the United States.

 

Click here to see the Intertek listing

 

 

 
Electrical Utility Programs
Friday, 12 June 2009 10:17

Reducing electricity consumption is sometimes contradictory to the goals of electrical utilities. For-profit utilities like to see top line growth each year. Government owned utilities are also driven by growth as dictated by their elected bosses. With global warming, both types of utilities are being offered encouragement and sometimes incentives to reduce electricity consumption by their customer base. It is believed that reduced consumption and improved energy efficiency will reduce the amount of non renewable energy spent and burnt in the environment.

The OnPlug was designed to reduce power consumption and is ideally suited for utilities looking to encourage energy efficiency. At the retail price point of  $11.99 the OnPlug is affordable for all homes. Anecdotally, utilites have found that many of their programs are not affordable for lower income families. Solar panels, furnace replacement  even compact fluorescent lights etc. can be very expensive. A single OnPlug sent to every family can serve to cut down on electricity and can also serve to engage customers in a discussion on energy saving.

OnPlug Innovations is very interested in working with utilities on new and existing program development and promotion. 

 

Contact: Gerry Heffernan, 1.709.739.6369

 

 
OnPlug for Dollars
Friday, 30 April 2010 13:05

JR Raphael at PC World has done some very cool research on how much money can be saved by getting aggressive on saving vampire power. Looking at some of the numbers in this article one can see that monetary payback on your OnPlug purchase can be quite fast. Of course we know the payback to the environment begins immediately once you switch off.

 

http://www.pcworld.com/article/153245/unplug_for_dollars_stop_vampire_power_waste.html

 
Vampire Appliances

If you have an appliance that needlessly consumes electricity you should On plug it. All appliances with a remote control sit there consuming phantom power for our convenience.

Click here for more information on how to save on your electricity bill.

http://www.onplug.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=42&Itemid=61〈=en

 

 
Encouraging Sustainability: Going Green

Pink was the new black, and now green is the new pink. And while we’re at it, geek is the new  chic, with nerds suddenly being ‘in’ thanks to The Big Bang Theory. But we digress. Going green is now considered a solid business strategy, and not simply to please the environmental lobby. Environmental friendliness simply makes good business sense.

One way big business is embracing nature is by building into it. Green or sustainable construction includes using fewer materials in the actual building, thus protecting raw products like limestone ad wood. It also involves reducing wasted items, and making sure that the materials are not toxic to the eventual user. So that means less lead and asbestos, for example. A green building is sustainable during use, by encouraging less consumption of energy and water because of how they house or office is made.

For instance, solar panels or wind turbines may be installed instead of conventional electricity, and the plumbing may be set to recycle bath or dish washing water. This kind of construction is being increasingly used not just in high-rise office blocks, but also in executive’s homes. It is a status symbol, just like the one-dollar-paycheck.

Incorporating nature into workplaces using gardens and plants boosts oxygen levels and therefore staff performance, which all add to the bottom line. Going green pays. As does saving electricity. Check out these pages for new ideas on energy savings.

 
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